Meet our Education Birds | FDOC - Fundashon Dier en Onderwijs Cariben - FDOC
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We believe that environmental education is very important

The connection between flora, fauna and our relationship with them as a human beings is a important one; children need to understand what impact they can have on our environment. During our education sessions, we adapt to the age of the children we work with; with teenagers we discuss how their future jobs/profession may impact wildlife and how they can be the driving force behind making these neccesary changes to these practices making them  safer for our nature.                       

The younger listeners get explained why balloons for example, even if they disintegrate after 6 months can pose a threat to the friends of the animals they see. Balloon examples are a big succes with children, therefore the message always comes across loud and clear. For Children hearing how something so simple can effect wildlife is a real eye opener. Drs. Doest further explains to the younger generatiom how painful it is to have to operate a bird to take out plastic residue that has been digested due to our carelessness as human beings. 

Watch Video: Storytellers 2020
Bob

Bob

Bob is a Caribbean flamingo estimated to be born in 2004. He spent part of his youth at the Curaçao Seaquarium and was released as he did not fit in the group, and developed bumblefoot. Unfortunately, he did not thrive in the wilderness, fell sick and flew into the Hilton hotel in 2016. The injuries he sustained and his chronic bumble feet made him unsuitable for placement in either the zoo or seaquarium. Aside from that his behavior also played a enormous role, being quite tame made him stand out as an odd bird in the wild and he would just not fit in. His bumblefoot which he already had when he was found in 2016 makes it difficult for him to forage in the wild. He is now well trained to be around people and doesn’t mind his conservation education job. His other job is to calm wild flamingos as they come in, reduce their stress and teach them how to feed on our food, so their stay, recovery, and release will go as smooth as possible.

Read more: Nat Geo highlight
Crockey

Crockey

Our little parrot diva is Drs. Doest' first pet parrot and the biggest reason she wanted to become an avian veterinarian. She got her for her 10th birthday in 1983, as a young parrot. When she researched Crockeys species (amazona barbadensis), she soon realized, that Crockey had been part of the pet trade that costed countless birds lives every year. Because of that she wanted to give back and help protect the population that was still in the wild. Little Drs. Doest wanted to contribute to the education, explain other children how cool birds are as pets, but at the same time encourage responsible ownership. Nowadays she  Discourages the ownership of wild caught birds and educates people on giving their birds the right diet and treatment. She wants everyone to realize that birds like Crockey can live to be 50-70 years old, and are a Big responsibility.

Willy

Willy

Willy fell out of a tree as a chick and was given to the foundation to be rescued. She is a chestnut fronted macaw or ara severa. There is a feral colony of a variety of parrots species that started with a population that escape in the 1980 ties. They’re now seen all over the island and breed in large palm trees. She was named after one of Drs. Doest aunties, Wil Lucasius, as she was found on the day of aunt Wil's funeral and Drs. Doest picked her up on her way to the funeral. So yes Drs. Doest snuck a baby parrot in her handbag, into the funeral, cause she could not leave her in the car... Aunt Wil would surely have loved  and laughed at that and was one of Drs. Doest biggest conservation work fans. Willy is free flighted and teaches children about the effects of the feral pet population on the indigenous parrot population, as well as how to keep a parrot responsibly. She flies freely in the class rooms which is always very exciting for the children.

Ricky

Ricky

Ricky is a northern crested caracara, (caracara cheriway),  which local name is Warawara who has been with Drs. Doest since 2008. He used to live in a raptor rescue center which ceased to exist and came to Drs. Doest together with Goofy. He has been doing education sessions with Drs. Doest ever since. He shows the children that he can find hidden pieces of meat, by smell, at the same time showing how harmfull it can be if the children threw foodcontainer or bags out of the car window.

 

 

Goofy

Goofy

Goofy is the same species as Ricky, a  northern crested caracara. She was very sick in the beginning and ended up living inside of the house for a long time. We call her our “chicken” as she peacefully wanders through the house and does not chase small mammals or birds. Her favorite pass time is getting head scratches. She is the walker and really does not like to fly.

Talon

Talon

Talon is the youngest and we take him out to fly a lot. He was confiscated and trained for release. Unfortunately, he kept returning to our facility after release. For  his own safety (he was not afraid of dogs anymore after a while) and the safety of our free-roaming chickens and rabbits we took him back in. He is a quick learner and has been to various schools already.